carrionofmywaywardson

Dissecting a character to fit a heteronormative box is sloppy and irresponsible. Bisexuals deserve to be represented in media too — not erased or straight-washed. If NBC can’t handle portraying a bisexual male character, then perhaps the network shouldn’t take on John Constantine.

Sexuality is always a part of a character — however minimal — but some sort of romantic or sexual relationship is usually a significant plot point in superhero stories. A bisexual male superhero would disrupt the hetero male template of, “hero saves damsel in distress” that we see consistently in iconic stories like Superman, Spiderman, and Captain America. But it’s 2014, and sometimes men need saving too.

There’s something particularly elusive about bisexual male characters. There is a deeply ingrained misconception that a man can’t be romantically involved with another man and still be interested in women as well. It’s centered on the idea that masculinity requires a wanting, and “getting” of women, and not men. But the depiction of Constantine in Hellblazer proves that is a false assumption.

wincelestials

overnight-shipping:

bayoread:

myrtlewilson:

judedeluca:

myrtlewilson:

none of your mythological faves were even remotely straight like welcome 2 the real world hercules had a fuckton of anal sex

People believe what they choose to.

it’s literally not a matter of belief there is literally a vase with a painting of zeus fucking his cupbearer ganymede while ganymede is holding a dildo like u can’t just not believe in thousand year old pottery

image

That’s not even just a dildo that’s a strap on

wincelestials

dieceased:

cub-with-a-k:

Alright I’m gonna talk about this for a second because I think it’s really important. I have heard a lot of people criticize Daisy for being a dumb character; “a bauble of a woman” I think one review called her when the movie came out this summer. And I’ve always felt confused when people say that, because I never thought Daisy was stupid. Vain, selfish, and indecisive, yes, but never stupid, and a lot of my reasoning for that belief came from this line . “I hope she’ll be a fool,” she says, because she is NOT a fool. Daisy sees the world for what it is (which is something Gatsby could never do, by the way) and that’s why everything is so hard for her. She understands what are actually the themes of the novel: that sometimes your dreams die and that those things you value are actually not valuable. That’s what she learned after Gatsby left and she entered a loveless marriage with a horrible man, which is a difficult thing to experience even if you are an idiot. But she never wants anyone to have to experience those things the way she’s experienced them, or to learn what she believed was the horrible truth of 1920s America; she’d much rather pretend that everything was okay, so that’s exactly what she does. She just pretends. Daisy is a lot of things, but a fool is not one of them.

how many high school kids do you think copied and pasted that into their essay for their english class